Daily New Shares
Welcome
Login / Register

Advertisement

World News


  • UN accuses Israel for supplying arms to South Sudan

    The United Nations has accused Israel of fuelling the war in South Sudan through the sale of arms to the government of the East Africa country, according to a confidential report by the humanitarian organization reports the East African.

    UN Experts discussed the report in a high level Security Council meeting last week disclosing the substantial evidence that shows the arms deals between Israel and South Sudan, particularly around the outbreak of the war in December 2013.

    “This evidence illustrates the well-established networks through which weapons procurement is coordinated from suppliers in eastern Europe and the Middle East and then transferred through middlemen in eastern Africa to South Sudan,” the report says.

    Read more »
  • A Nigerian man arrested for naming dog after President Buhari - BBC Africa

    Joe Fortemose Chinakwe walked Buhari in an area where support for the president was high, police said.

    Officers said they were worried the moved could antagonise people, though he insisted it was meant as a compliment.

    He has been granted bail but remains in jail as funds are sought, reports said.

    Mr Chinakwe, 30, said that he named the dog Buhari because he had admired Mr Buhari for many years.

    "I named my beloved pet dog Buhari, who is my hero," Mr Chinakwe said. "My admiration for Buhari started far back when he was a military head of state."

    Death threats

    He was inspired to give his dog the name after reading about Mr Buhari's fight against corruption, he added.

    He later told local media he had received death threats over the perceived slight.

    Twitters users reacted to the arrest with a mixture of amusement and concern.

    "If we keep quiet when they arrest the man who named his dog Buhari who will talk for us when they arrest us for criticizing the real Buhari?" said Reno Omokri.

    Mr Chinakwe's case was adjourned until 19 September.

     

    Read more »
  • Ethiopia: Protests in Oromia, Amhara Regions Present 'Critical Challenge' - U.S.

    The Obama administration's top official promoting democracy and human rights,Tom Malinowski, says the Ethiopian government's tactics in response to protests in the Oromia and Amhara regions of the country are "self-defeating". Writing ahead of the arrival of U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry in Nairobi for talks on East African issues, including security, Malinowski says Addis Ababa's "next great national task is to master the challenge of political openness." The United States and Ethiopia have years of strong partnership, based on a recognition that we need each other. Ethiopia is a major contributor to peace and security in Africa, the U.S.'s ally in the fight against violent extremists, and has shown incredible generosity to those escaping violence and repression, admitting more refugees than any country in the world. The United States has meanwhile been the main contributor to Ethiopia's impressive fight to end poverty, to protect its environment and to develop its economy. Because of the friendship and common interests our two nations share, the U.S. has a stake in Ethiopia's prosperity, stability and success. When Ethiopia does well, it is able to inspire and help others. On the other hand, a protracted crisis in Ethiopia would undermine the goals that both nations are trying to achieve together. The recent protests in the Oromia and Amhara regions present a critical challenge. They appear to be a manifestation of Ethiopian citizens' expectation of more responsive governance and political pluralism, as laid out in their constitution. Almost every Ethiopian I have met during my three recent trips to the country, including government officials, has told me that as Ethiopians become more prosperous and educated, they demand a greater political voice, and that such demands must be met. While a few of the protests may have been used as a vehicle for violence, we are convinced that the vast majority of participants were exercising their right under Ethiopia's constitution to express their views. Any counsel that the United States might offer is intended to help find solutions, and is given with humility. As President Barack Obama said during his July, 2015 visit to Addis Ababa, the U.S. is not perfect, and we have learned hard lessons from our own experiences in addressing popular grievances. We also know Ethiopia faces real external threats. Ethiopia has bravely confronted Al-Shabaab, a ruthless terrorist group based on its border. Individuals and groups outside Ethiopia, often backed by countries that have no respect for human rights themselves, sometimes recklessly call for violent change. Ethiopia rightly condemns such rhetoric, and the United States joins that condemnation. But Ethiopia has made far too much progress to be undone by the jabs of scattered antagonists who have little support among the Ethiopian people. And it is from within that Ethiopia faces the greatest challenges to its stability and unity. When thousands of people, in dozens of locations, in multiple regions come out on the streets to ask for a bigger say in the decisions that affect their lives, this cannot be dismissed as the handiwork of external enemies. Ethiopian officials have acknowledged that protestors have genuine grievances that deserve sincere answers. They are working to address issues such as corruption and a lack of job opportunities. Yet security forces have continued to use excessive force to prevent Ethiopians from congregating peacefully, killing and injuring many people and arresting thousands. We believe thousands of Ethiopians remain in detention for alleged involvement in the protests - in most cases without having been brought before a court, provided access to legal counsel, or formally charged with a crime. These are self-defeating tactics. Arresting opposition leaders and restricting civil society will not stop people from protesting, but it can create leaderless movements that leave no one with whom the government can mediate a peaceful way forward. Shutting down the Internet will not silence opposition, but it will scare away foreign investors and tourists. Using force may temporarily deter some protesters, but it will exacerbate their anger and make them more uncompromising when they inevitably return to the streets. Every government has a duty to protect its citizens; but every legitimate and successful government also listens to its citizens, admits mistakes, and offers redress to those it has unjustly harmed. Responding openly and peacefully to criticism shows confidence and wisdom, not weakness. Ethiopia would also be stronger if it had more independent voices in government, parliament and society, and if civil society organizations could legally channel popular grievances and propose policy solutions. Those who are critical of the government would then have to share responsibility, and accountability, for finding those solutions. Progress in reforming the system would moderate demands to reject it altogether. Ethiopia's next great national task is to master the challenge of political openness, just as it has been mastering the challenge of economic development. Given how far Ethiopia has traveled since the days of terror and famine, the United States is confident that its people can meet this challenge - not to satisfy any foreign country, but to fulfill their own aspirations. The U.S. and all of Ethiopia's friends are ready to help. Tom Malinowski is the U.S. Assistant Secretary of State for Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor.

    Read more »
  • ‘No Ethiopians wanted’ job ad sparks outrage

     

    Justice Ministry officials expressed outrage on Wednesday over a recruitment ad that stated that Israelis of Ethiopian descent were not wanted.

    The ad, published by the LM manpower company, called for warehouse workers to fold clothes at a Caesarea-based fashion company, Walla reported. The ad noted that the job was 7 a.m.-5 p.m. and paid minimum wage (NIS 25 an hour, or $6.50), and specified that the employer “does not want Ethiopians.”

    Justice Ministry Director Emi Palmor said that, if true, the ad was “a blatant case of discrimination and racism.” Palmor, who also heads a ministerial committee seeking to uproot racism against Ethiopian Israelis, noted that testimony submitted to the committee indicated “this is not the first case, and certainly not the only case.”

    Palmor said the case would be investigated by the commissioner for equal employment opportunities in the Economy Ministry.

    The fashion company, Expose, said in response that it had nothing to do with the offensive caveat, and that the ad was published without its knowledge. “This wasn’t published by us and certainly isn’t acceptable according to our values,” a spokeswoman said. “This doesn’t reflect our opinions at all.”

    The manpower company said the ad was a result of “human error” and that it was removed “the moment we found out.” Notably, the company did not deny the actual request by the client.

    “This was not for publication. It was somehow leaked out. It was supposed to stay inside the company and be dealt with inside the company,” a statement by LM said. “This is not something we promote. Apparently it was a human error. We don’t support racist statements. We believe in recruitment for all ethnic groups and communities.”

    The ad was blasted by Israeli officials.

    Social Equality Minister Gila Gamliel called it “appalling” and said she would bring the matter before the cabinet on Thursday.

    “Racism and discrimination cut through sectors and groups in Israeli society. We must put an end to it once and for all,” she said.

    MK Omer Barlev of the Zionist Union said it was “unacceptable for people of the Ethiopian community to be a punching bag for lowly racists. Not in the State of Israel and not on our watch.” He vowed to promote legislation to prevent such incidents from recurring.

    MK Karin Elharar (Yesh Atid) said it was “shameful… we mustn’t allow this to be a part of society,” while Michal Biran (Zionist Union) said it was shocking to find such displays of racism in present-day Israel.

    In July Palmor submitted a major report to Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu on ways to combat racism against Israelis of Ethiopian heritage.

    The report was produced by the committee chaired by Palmor, which was established in response to recent public street protests by Ethiopian Israeli activists against what they said was the rampant prejudice they face in Israeli society.

    The issue rose to the fore last year amid accusations by Ethiopian Israelis of rampant police brutality and abuse against members of the community. The community staged a series of demonstrations across the country, triggered by video footage showing a seemingly unprovoked police assault on an Ethiopian-Israeli soldier in April 2015.

    Thousands took to the streets demanding the government address the alleged systematic and institutionalized racism faced by the Ethiopian Israeli community. Activists also expressed their frustration with what they said was the state’s shortcomings in addressing the social and economic needs of their community.

    The latest report marks the conclusion of months of deliberations that resulted from last year’s tensions. It offers 53 detailed recommendations for tackling racism throughout Israeli society, mainly through the education system.

    Upon receiving the report Netanyahu promised to take “further steps” in the wake of the report. Racism, he said, “is unbecoming of our country, our citizens and our nation.”

    Source :http://www.timesofisrael.com/no-ethiopians-wanted-job-ad-sparks-outrage/

    Read more »
  • Unprecedented Ethiopia protests far from over: analysts

     

     

    Regional protests that began last year in Ethiopia have spread across the country, and despite successive crackdowns analysts say dissatisfaction with the authoritarian government is driving ever greater unrest.

    Demonstrations began popping up in November 2015 in the Oromia region, which surrounds the capital, due to a government plan to expand the boundaries of Addis Ababa.

    The region's Oromo people feared their farmland would be seized, and though the authorities soon dropped the urban enlargement project and brutally suppressed the protests, they badly misjudged the anger it triggered.

    Protests have since swept other parts of Oromia, and more recently to the northern Amhara region, causing disquiet in the corridors of power of a key US ally and crucial partner in east Africa's fight against terrorism.

    "Since it came to power in 1991, the regime has never witnessed such a bad stretch... Ethiopia resembles a plane going through a zone of extreme turbulence," independent Horn of Africa researcher Rene Lafort told AFP.

    Despite what he described as the "state of siege" imposed on the Oromia region in recent weeks, the protests have refused to die down, and demonstrators have been challenging government more and more openly.

    - Minority rule -

    One rally was even held in Addis Ababa on Saturday, a rare event for the seat of power of a nation ruled by a regime considered among the most repressive in Africa.

    More than 140 people were killed when security forces put down the original Oromia land protests, shot or tortured to death, according to rights groups.

    A fresh crackdown over the weekend led to the deaths of almost 100 more, according to an Amnesty International toll, with live fire used on the crowds.

    "This crisis is systemic because it shakes the foundations of the model of government put into place 25 years ago, which is authoritarian and centralised," Lafort explained.

    The protesters have different grievances but are united by their disaffection with the country's leaders, who largely hail from the northern Tigray region and represent less than 10 percent of the population.

    Prime Minister Hailemariam Desalegn heads the Ethiopian People's Revolutionary Democratic Front (EPRDF), which won all the seats in parliament in elections last year.

    Although he comes from the minority Wolayta people, he is surrounded in government by Tigreans, who also dominate the security forces and positions of economic power.

    Getachew Metaferia, professor of political science at Morgan State University in the United States, described the state as "controlled by an ethnic minority imposing its will on the majority," a crucial factor in understanding the protests.

    More than 60 percent of the country's almost 100 million people are either Amhara or Oromo.

    "There is no fundamental discussion with the people, no dialogue... the level of frustration is increasing. I don't think there will be a return back to normal," the professor added.

    The country's rulers have cultivated the skyrocketing growth and rapidly improving health outcomes that have changed the face of a nation whose famines weighed on the world's conscience in 1980s.

    But their grip on civil liberties has tightened: Ethiopia ranked 142 of 180 countries in Reporters Without Borders' press freedom index this year, and social media used to organise rallies is regularly blocked by the authorities.

    The use of anti-terror laws to jail opposition critics has also provoked ire, combined with more local issues such as the targeting of Amharan politicians campaigning for a referendum on a district absorbed into Tigrean territory.

    - Reclaiming freedoms -

    The West has largely avoided direct criticism of the country's rights record because Ethiopia is credited with beating back Al-Qaeda-affiliated Shabaab militants in Somalia, but the protests put its allies in an awkward spot.

    "Ethiopia's leaders have lost the vision of Meles. They are showing signs of nervousness and don't place trust in their own people," said one European diplomat on condition of anonymity.

    After toppling dictator Mengistu Haile Mariam in 1991, Meles Zenawi ruled with an iron fist until he died in 2012, and Hailemariam took over.

    More used to its image as an oasis of calm in a troubled region, the government is swift to blame foreign "terrorist groups" for the unrest, usually pointing the finger at neighbouring Eritrea.

    Hailemariam last Friday announced a ban on demonstrations which "threaten national unity" and called on police to use all means at their disposal to prevent them.

    Merera Gudina, leader of the opposition Oromo People's Congress, said the nebulous movements were not affiliated with traditional political parties and were focused above all on claiming back freedoms the government has long denied.

    "We are nine months into this protest. I don't think it will stop," he told AFP. "This is an intifada," he said, using a term which means uprising.

    Source: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/wires/afp/article-3732964/Unprecedented-Ethiopia-protests-far-analysts.html

    Read more »
RSS