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  • An Opinion Poll Revealed Pope Francis is the Most Popular than any Political World Leader


     

    p International indicates that Roman Catholics and Jews have the most favourable opinion of the Pope. More than half of the world's protestants and even the majority of atheists and agnostics view him favourably. About 1,000 people were questioned in 64 countries.

    It gave him a net score - the difference between favourable and unfavourable opinions - of +41 ahead of US President Barack Obama on +30; German Chancellor Angela Merkel on +13; UK Prime Minister David Cameron on +10 and French President Francois Hollande on +6.
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  • Johan Cruyff, Total Football pioneer, dies at the age of 68

     

     

    d Johan Cruyff has died of cancer at the age of 68. The Dutchman, who on three occasions was voted the world player of the year, guided Holland to the World Cup final in 1974 and as a manager he spent eight years in charge of Barcelona.  “On March 24 2016 Johan Cruyff (68) died peacefully in Barcelona, surrounded by his family after a hard fought battle with cancer. It’s with great sadness that we ask you to respect the family’s privacy during their time of grief,” read a statement on the World of Johan Cruyff website.

    Just last month the former Ajax, Barcelona and Holland star, one of the main exponents, along with Rinus Michels, of the world famous Total Football – the Dutch style of play that involved players constantly interchanging roles – popularised in the 1970s but still playing a major influence on modern football, said he was “2-0 up” in his match with lung cancer. “With great sadness we have learned of the death of Johan Cruyff. Words are not enough,” wrote the Dutch football federation on Twitter. Ajax issued a short statement that read: “Johan Cruyff has died in Barcelona at the age of 68. The greatest Ajax player of all time had suffered with lung cancer since October last year. Ajax share in this great loss and wish the families much strength.”
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  • Al Qaeda release pictures of gunmen who carried out Burkina Faso massacre

     

     

    Wearing military clothing and carrying machine guns, these are the men al-Qaeda claim went on the rampage slaughtering guests at a hotel in Burkina Faso. A picture of the three gunmen was released along with a statement by the terror group which claimed responsibility for 'conquest Burkina Faso' over the weekend. Al-Qaeda identified the men as Al-Battar Al-Ansari, Abu Muhammad al-Ahmad al-Buqali and Fulani - with each given a nom de guerre.

     

    It comes as survivors described how jihadis targeted Westerners at the Splendid Hotel by executing those who looked to be European as they lay injured after being gunned down. At least one American and six Canadians, as well as French, Dutch and Swiss nationals are among the 29 people from 18 different countries killed during the 15-hour terror attack by militants. Among those killed was a nine-year-old boy.
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  • What are the signs and symptoms Breast cancer?

     

     

    Worldwide, breast cancer is the most common invasive cancer in women.

    (The most common form of cancer is non-invasive non-melanoma skin cancer; non-invasive cancers are generally easily cured, cause very few deaths, and are routinely excluded from cancer statistics.) Breast cancer comprises 22.9% of invasive cancers in women[128] and 16% of all female cancers.[129] In 2012, it comprised 25.2% of cancers diagnosed in women, making it the most common female cancer.[130]

    In 2008, breast cancer caused 458,503 deaths worldwide (13.7% of cancer deaths in women and 6.0% of all cancer deaths for men and women together).[128] Lung cancer, the second most common cause of cancer-related death in women, caused 12.8% of cancer deaths in women (18.2% of all cancer deaths for men and women together).

    Factors that are associated with an increased risk of breast cancer include:

    Being female. Women are much more likely than men are to develop breast cancer.
    Increasing age. Your risk of breast cancer increases as you age.
    A personal history of breast cancer. If you’ve had breast cancer in one breast, you have an increased risk of developing cancer in the other breast.
    A family history of breast cancer. If your mother, sister or daughter was diagnosed with breast cancer, particularly at a young age, your risk of breast cancer is increased. Still, the majority of people diagnosed with breast cancer have no family history of the disease.
    Inherited genes that increase cancer risk. Certain gene mutations that increase the risk of breast cancer can be passed from parents to children. The most common gene mutations are referred to as BRCA1 and BRCA2. These genes can greatly increase your risk of breast cancer and other cancers, but they don’t make cancer inevitable.
    Radiation exposure. If you received radiation treatments to your chest as a child or young adult, your risk of breast cancer is increased.
    Obesity. Being obese increases your risk of breast cancer.
    Beginning your period at a younger age. Beginning your period before age 12 increases your risk of breast cancer.
    Beginning menopause at an older age. If you began menopause at an older age, you’re more likely to develop breast cancer.
    Having your first child at an older age. Women who give birth to their first child after age 35 may have an increased risk of breast cancer.
    Having never been pregnant. Women who have never been pregnant have a greater risk of breast cancer than do women who have had one or more pregnancies.
    Postmenopausal hormone therapy. Women who take hormone therapy medications that combine estrogen and progesterone to treat the signs and symptoms of menopause have an increased risk of breast cancer. The risk of breast cancer decreases when women stop taking these medications.
    Drinking alcohol. Drinking alcohol increases the risk of breast cancer.

    Symptoms of breast cancer
    Breast cancer can have a number of symptoms, but the first noticeable symptom is usually a lump or area of thickened breast tissue.

    Most breast lumps aren’t cancerous, but it’s always best to have them checked by your doctor. You should also see your GP if you notice any of the following:

    • A change in the size or shape of one or both breasts
    • Discharge from either of your nipples (which may be streaked with blood)
    • A lump or swelling in either of your armpits
    • Dimpling on the skin of your breasts
    • A rash on or around your nipple
    • A change in the appearance of your nipple, such as becoming sunken into your breast
    • Breast pain isn’t usually a symptom of breast cancer.

    Types of breast cancer
    There are several different types of breast cancer, which can develop in different parts of the breast. Breast cancer is often divided into non-invasive and invasive types.

    Non-invasive breast cancer
    Non-invasive breast cancer is also known as cancer or carcinoma in situ. This cancer is found in the ducts of the breast and hasn’t developed the ability to spread outside the breast.
    This form of cancer rarely shows as a lump in the breast that can be felt, and is usually found on a mammogram (see below).The most common type of non-invasive cancer is ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS).

    Invasive breast cancer
    Invasive cancer has the ability to spread outside the breast, although this doesn’t necessarily mean it has spread.
    The most common form of breast cancer is invasive ductal breast cancer, which develops in the cells that line the breast ducts. Invasive ductal breast cancer accounts for about 80% of all breast cancer cases and is sometimes called “no special type”.

    Other types of breast cancer
    Other less common types of breast cancer include invasive lobular breast cancer, which develops in the cells that line the milk-producing lobules, inflammatory breast cancer and Paget’s disease of the breast.
    It’s possible for breast cancer to spread to other parts of the body, usually through the lymph nodes (small glands that filter bacteria from the body) or the bloodstream. If this happens, it’s known as “secondary” or “metastatic” breast cancer.

    Breast cancer screening
    About one in eight women are diagnosed with breast cancer during their lifetime. There’s a good chance of recovery if it’s detected in its early stages. For this reason, it’s vital that women check their breasts regularly for any changes and always get any changes examined by their GP.
    Mammographic screening (where X-ray images of the breast are taken) is the best available method of detecting an early breast lesion. However, you should be aware that a mammogram might fail to detect some breast cancers. It might also increase your chances of having extra tests and interventions, including surgery.
    Women with a higher-than-average risk of developing breast cancer may be offered screening and genetic testing for the condition.
    As the risk of breast cancer increases with age, all women who are 50-70 years old are invited for breast cancer screening every three years.
    Women over 70 are also entitled to screening and can arrange an appointment through their GP or local screening unit.

    Source:-www.honeliat.com

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  • 50 small things you can do every day to Really Love Yourself

    When we love ourselves, it helps us feel our best, and when we feel our best, we can give more to the world. Treating yourself well, and with love, is more than eating healthy and exercising.

    What exactly is self-love, though? In Psychology Today, Deborah Khoshaba, Psy.D. writes, “Self-love is a state of appreciation for oneself that grows from actions that support our physical, psychological and spiritual growth. Self-love is dynamic; it grows by actions that mature us.”

    She explains the profound effects of self-love, stating, “When we act in ways that expand self-love in us, we begin to accept much better our weaknesses as well as our strengths, have less need to explain away our short-comings, have compassion for ourselves as human beings struggling to find personal meaning, are more centered in our life purpose and values, and expect living fulfillment through our own efforts.”

    Here are 50 small things you can do every day to practice self-love. They are divided into categories of the 7 Dimensions of Wellness, so you can practice self-love in all areas of well being.

    Social wellness

    Social wellness is the ability to connect with others and develop positive relationships. To practice self-love in your social life, do the following:

    1. Connect today with someone who is positive, inspiring, and encouraging.

    2. Visit with your neighbor.

    3. Send a note in the mail to a family member or friend.

    4. Plan a fun night out with friends.

    5. Snuggle with your love.

    Emotional wellness

    Emotional wellness is the ability to cope with life’s challenges. The University of California states,”The ability to acknowledge and share feelings of anger, fear, sadness or stress, hope, love, joy and happiness in a productive manner” contributes to increased emotional wellness. To practice self-love in this area, work on the following:

    6. If you’re not satisfied with your life, admit it to yourself, and write out your action plan to make changes.

    7. Spend 10 minutes today being quiet.

    8. Forgive yourself. You must accept that you are not perfect before you can love yourself.

    9. Seek the help you need — set up an appointment for counselling or therapy if you’re struggling emotionally. You are worth it.

    10. Spend 10 minutes working on a favorite stress-management technique.

    11. Write down your schedule for the day. This will help you set aside time each day to spend time on your priorities and minimize wasted time.

    12. Practice an optimistic attitude.

    13. Be mindful of your inner dialogue. The messages you tell yourself can greatly influence your life.

    14. Set boundaries on how you’ll spend your time. Steer clear of time-sucking activities that don’t add meaning to your life.

    15. Turn away from behaviors that tend to get you into trouble.

    16. Say no to toxic people and activities.

    17. Say yes to adventure.

    18. Have fun. Laugh every day.

    19. Compliment yourself.

    Spiritual wellness

    The University of California describes spiritual wellness as “the ability to establish peace and harmony in our lives.” To practice self-love in your spiritual life, take these actions:

    21. Explore your faith.

    22. Spend time in prayer or meditation.

    23. Seek an opportunity to grow in one of the challenges in your life.

    24. Get outside in nature.

    25. Do something altruistic.

    Environmental wellness

    Being environmentally well means recognizing your responsibility to make a positive impact on the earth. To practice self-love and environmental wellness, try these tips:

    26. Practice not buying what you don’t need.

    27. Donate items you don’t need. Practice getting rid of 1 item per day.

    Occupational wellness

    Occupational wellness involves getting fulfillment from your work. To practice self-love in your work life, take these steps:

    28. Learn about your strengths.

    29. Discover your passion. This workbook is a great start.

    30. Write down your big career goals.

    31. Take one small step each day toward your dream career.

    32. Connect with a coworker.

    Intellectual wellness

    When you are intellectually well, you continually expand your knowledge as a lifelong learner. To practice self-love intellectually, try these actions:

    33. Read 1 page of a book that interests you today.

    34. Learn.

    35. Book an adventure to a new place.

    36. Sign up for a new class through community education or a local college.

    37. Take a small step out of your comfort zone every day.

    Physical wellness

    Optimal physical wellness is achieved when you have a healthy quality of life. To practice self-love and increase physical wellness, try these actions:

    38. Appreciate the amazing things your body can do rather than focusing on what you consider to be your “flaws.”

    39. Schedule your routine physical with your doctor.

    40. Pick a new vegetable to eat.

    41. Choose one new healthy recipe to make this week.

    42. While you eat, focus on your meal.

    43. Make a specific game plan to quit a destructive habit.

    44. Nourish your body with healthy choices.

    45. Establish a nighttime routine for a healthy dose of sleep.

    A few bonuses

    46. Set aside time each day to work toward making a big dream of yours a reality. Guard this time furiously.

    47. Do something you love every day.

    48. Buy yourself fresh flowers someday soon, just for fun.

    49. Schedule a massage.

    50. Start a gratitude journal and list something you are thankful for every day.

    When you start working on these small actions, you’ll begin to accept and appreciate yourself more. When you genuinely love yourself and love life, it causes amazing effects in your life and in the lives of those around you.

    Source: lifehack.org

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